Slavic Dragomir’s Recent Visit To Washington, D.C.

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CONFERENCE WITH MOLDOVAN AMBASSADOR TO THE UNITED STATES

May 11, 2102

Washington, D.C.

On May 9th nothing happens in Moldova in commemoration of over-throwing of Nazi-Regime during 1945.  But, the energy generated from this commemoration is more than that of a steam-engine unleashed, it is political energy that can push a new Nation forward. Since March 26, Moldova has a new President; elected by the pro-European Integration Alliance. It is a for the first time since the Cold War, a “democratic” Government.  This year of 2012 is a special occasion in Moldova’s “re-birth”.

On May 8, 2012, Moldovan citizen and activist Slavic Dragomir of Northern California visited in Washington, D.C. with the newly appointed Ambassador to the United States Igor Munteanu. The Ambassador has been recognized as a regional security specialist and knowledgeable about the European Neighborhood Policy and NATO–Moldova relations.

Ambassador Igor Munteanu repeated to Mr. Dragomir, “I wish that, during my mission at the Embassy, we could succeed together to institutionalize a new image which elevates the visibility and the prestige of the carriers of the national culture, traditions, and art that is exclusive to our country.”

The Ambassador was previously a frequent political commentator broadcast on both the BBC and Radio Free Europe.  But, on this day he was in conference with an old friend.

Together, these Moldovan patriots, reminisced about their native Moldova’s political struggles over the last twenty-years.  The two shared comments about old photos of those struggles and today’s promises; the early days of 1990’s witnessed the emerging Moldovan “democratic” Republic.  Moldova is now taking its rightful place among the Free Peoples of the World, the self-represented community of Nations. But, this situation has not been without great sacrifice, pain and yes, bloodshed, remembered in these hours recently.

It was a clear and pleasant scene along Washington, D.C.’s lengthy Boulevards, as Moldova’s diaspora representative Dragomir and his Ambassador met near Embassy Row in the North-West section of this Diplomatic City by the Potomac River.  History is made here.  And the stories shared by these two men were the tales of Revolution and Victory.  Their mild manner and gentle nature might well have been reflective of a meeting of a Colonel Robert Morgan meeting with Ambassador Benjamin Franklin during some time after the American Revolution.  It was a reflective time to be sure, but also with so much ahead for which to prepare.  The consequences of their actions, or in-action, are monumental.

And prepare they did.  They planned the Ambassador’s imminent visit to Northern California’s enclave for seventeen thousand Moldovan ex-patriots living there peacefully, but anxiously, monitoring the political “tug-a-war” in their Homeland.  The choice of this enclave by Moldovans was for obvious reasons of compatible terrain and climate, but also for tradition of the many vineyards within an hour’s drive.  Moldovans love their wine choices, only next to family connections.

So, these brave former “Revolutionaries” privately conferred hour-after-hour soaking-up the political vintage of their labors.  Their task is not finished; and they no doubt grasp the urgency of their every decision while in the Capitol of the most powerful Nation on earth.  Moldova may be strong in tradition, grapes and family; but the United States’ industrial, political and military might will be needed for support.  Without it, this new “Democracy” will not survive while its south-east “Transnistria Region” remains with former Soviet troops occupying Moldova on the pretext of “Peace-Keeping” operations.

There is big work ahead.  But, for this visit, the public-view is ceremony.  The presentation of diplomatic credentials to the United States Secretary of State was previously accomplished with the usual formalities.  The Ambassador’s big work is begun.  Freedom is stronger today, than last week.

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Lika Emelyanova

Russian Time Magazine Contributor

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